Novica Cultured pearl and garnet flower necklace Red Floral Princess 0LPI9

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Novica Cultured pearl and garnet flower necklace, Red Floral Princess
Novica Cultured pearl and garnet flower necklace, Red Floral Princess
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Did you wear a big fat ’80s wedding gown? Or a tux with a skinny tie and mullet hair? We’d love to see it. Share your photos using this form , and we may feature them in a slide show on nytimes.com .

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By As told to Bonnie Wertheim

I had been married before, and this time I really wanted to do something that was a little more original. I have always endeavored to outdo New York on New York terms, and maybe stick a little tongue in cheek as well. It was an idea that came to me when I was scanning columns and seeing these occasional drop-ins that they used to do with “Happy Birthday,” “Happy Anniversary,” and I said to myself, “Gee, they could probably do a wedding in there as well.” I had the thought in my head, and I was at a favorite watering hole at lunch, having my meal and a couple of glasses of wine — I mean, those were the post-“Mad Men” days — and I mentioned to the bartender what I was thinking of doing. He said: “You really ought to do it. Here, let me buy you another glass of wine.”

So I had another glass of wine. Then I got into a cab, went to the Times building, asked for classifieds, came to a receptionist and was ushered into the back. I don’t recall if it was a man or woman who I spoke to, but the person’s jaw kind of dropped open like, “That’s what you want to do?” And then the person conferred with one or two colleagues who said, “Yeah that can be done.” So I placed it.

I think at the time it was about $250 or $300 to do that. In today’s dollars that would probably be $800 to $1,000, but whatever it was, for something that was going to be so one-of-a-kind, cost was really not the object to me. Before I left there, I was told what the likely publication date was.

I had a great relationship with the doorman. In those days, The Times used to be delivered to stores the night before. I asked the doorman to go out and get The Times for me — there was a very important story that I needed, if he wouldn’t mind bringing it up to me. At the time, I was with my girlfriend (later, my fiancée), and I said to her, “There’s an important story in The Times that I’ve got to see, on the front page.” So I called the doorman, he brought the paper to me and looked at me quizzically. I gave him a nice tip and he left. Then I said to my girlfriend, “Here’s the story, it’s on El Salvador. Just read it and then you’ll see why I wanted to get the paper.” When she got to the bottom of the page, she saw, “Suzanne, I adore you: Will you marry me?” And her mouth dropped open, and she said, “Yes, I will.”

We parted amicably after four and a half years of marriage.

It’s unlikely that I might want to marry again. And in any case, how could you top what I did?

See Doug Shafner’s proposal on the front page of the March 3, 1982 issue of The Times
Mass.gov
Progress Towards Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions
In May of 2012, former EEA Secretary Sullivan convened an Implementation Advisory Committee (IAC) to advise the Administration’s implementation of the Global Warming Solutions Act (GWSA).

The IAC features leaders from the business, energy, environmental, building, transportation, and academic communities in Massachusetts. Listed below is more detailed information on each IAC member.

Kathleen Theoharides, Assistant Secretary of Climate Change, Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs In the new Assistant Secretary of Climate Change position created by the Baker-Polito Administration, Katie Theoharides directs the Commonwealth’s climate change program which works across state government and with cities and towns to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and adapt to the impacts and opportunities from climate change, with a major focus on mainstreaming climate change into the daily work of state and local government. Originally trained as a field ecologist and invasive plant specialist, Ms. Theoharides has run an environmental policy consulting business, served as the Executive Director of a Massachusetts land trust, and worked on climate science and policy at Defenders of Wildlife in Washington, DC. Ms. Theoharides studied ecology, climate change, and environmental policy at Dartmouth College and UMass-Boston. She lives in Arlington with her husband and two small children.

Kathleen Theoharides, Assistant Secretary of Climate Change, Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs

As the Center Director of Fraunhofer CSE, Dr. Hoepfner leads the Photovoltaic Technologies, Building Energy Technology and Distributed Electrical Energy Systems research groups. He also oversees CSE’s contract research business. Before joining Fraunhofer CSE, Dr. Hoepfner was Vice President of Product Marketing and Management at Luminus Devices, which grew from an MIT start-up company to a world leader for specialty LED products. There, he was responsible for the successful commercialization of Luminus' high power light emitting diodes into the consumer electronics industry, and for introducing energy-efficient lighting products into energy savings markets. Prior to this, he worked at LNL Technologies, Bandwidth Semiconductor, and Spire in a wide range of roles and technology areas, including lasers, photo detectors, III-V semiconductor device design and processing, planar light guides, and chemical vapor deposition. Dr. Hoepfner received his PhD from the Free University Berlin, Germany, for work in thin film photovoltaics.

Dr. Christian Hoepfner , Center Director of Fraunhofer CSE

Richard A. Dimino has served as the President and CEO of A Better City (ABC) since 1995. Under his leadership, ABC has achieved major organizational accomplishments and influenced hundreds of city infrastructure projects. He significantly impacted the planning, design, and development of a twenty-seven acre corridor along Boston's waterfront, and, through his advocacy of Massachusetts’ Transportation Reform Legislation, the new Massachusetts Department of Transportation was formed. Within the organization, Mr. Dimino successfully launched the Sustainability and Climate Change Initiative and received numerous awards, including the Move Massachusetts Construction Achievement Award, the Boston Harbor Islands Governor's Award, and the Environmental Business Council of New England’s Environmental-Energy Merit Award.

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